Bird, bug, butterfly and a wild variety of photos from Belarus, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Scotland and Spain by Irish wildlife photographer Patrick J. O'Keeffe and invited guests

Thursday, 25 December 2014

EUROPEAN ROBIN (Erithacus rubecula) Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland

 
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 The European Robin (Erithacus rubecula) is of the  family Muscicapidae which is in the genus Erithacus.

Tuesday, 23 December 2014

EURASIAN SISKIN (Spinus spinus) male, Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland

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 The Eurasian Siskin (Carduelis spinus) is of the family Fringillidae which is in the genus Carduelis.

Friday, 19 December 2014

SONG THRUSH (Turdus philomelos) Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland

 
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 The Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos) is of the thrush family Turdidae which is in the genus Turdus.

Monday, 15 December 2014

EURASIAN BLACKBIRD (Turdus merula) male, Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland


 
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 The Eurasian Blackbird (Turdus merula) or more simply known as a Blackbird is of the thrush family Turdidae which is in the genus Turdus.

Saturday, 13 December 2014

BLACK REDSTART (1st winter) Phoenicurus ochruros Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland


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The Black Redstart (Phoenicurus ochruros) is a small perching bird in the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae which is the genus Phoenicurus. It is a locally common resident in central and southern Europe and northern Africa. It also occurs in western and central Asia. In the warmer parts of its range it is sedentary. The northern populations migrate in the autumn to spend the winter in southern and western Europe, northern Africa and the Indian sub continent. 

Text © www.rawbirds.com

Sunday, 7 December 2014

EUROPEAN TURTLE DOVE (Streptopelia turtur) Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland

 
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The European Turtle Dove (Streptopelia turtur) is a migratory member of the genus Columbidae, which includes doves and pigeons. It is a  summer breeding resident in Europe (including the Canary Islands), parts of the Middle East, as well as western Asia and north Africa. It is absent as a breeding species from Iceland, Ireland (formally bred) and most of Scandinavia but does occur in spring and autumn as an uncommon/rare overshooting migrant. Over much of its northern range, there has been a very sharp decline in its population. In the autumn, it migrates south to spend the winter in southern Africa.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Tuesday, 2 December 2014

HOUSE SPARROW (Passer domesticus) male, Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland

 
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 The House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) is of the sparrow family Passeridae which is in the genus Passer.

Monday, 1 December 2014

HOODED CROW or GREY CROW (Corvus cornix) drinking fresh blood along the road after a Rock Dove had been killed by a Eurasian Sparrowhawk, Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland

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The Hooded Crow (Corvus cornix) also known as Grey Crow is a member of the crow family Corvidae which is in the genus Corvus. Four subspecies are generally recognized. Despite the fact that it is heavily persecuted, it occurs throughout Western Asia including parts of the Middle East as well as along the Nile Valley in North Africa. It is also commonly encountered and has a widespread distribution in Northern, Central and Eastern Europe. It is resident in Ireland, the Isle of Man and Northern Scotland. In the rest of Britain as well as Southwestern and Western Europe, it is replaced by the closely related Carrion Crow (Corvus corone) from which it was split in 2002 and was recognised as a separate species. Where their breeding ranges overlap, they may hybridise. Some of the northern populations are migratory and move south for the winter.
    
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

HOODED CROW or GREY CROW (Corvus cornix) drinking fresh blood along the road after a Rock Dove had been killed by a Eurasian Sparrowhawk, Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland

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The Hooded Crow (Corvus cornix) also known as Grey Crow is a member of the crow family Corvidae which is in the genus Corvus. Four subspecies are generally recognized. Despite the fact that it is heavily persecuted, it occurs throughout Western Asia including parts of the Middle East as well as along the Nile Valley in North Africa. It is also commonly encountered and has a widespread distribution in Northern, Central and Eastern Europe. It is resident in Ireland, the Isle of Man and Northern Scotland. In the rest of Britain as well as Southwestern and Western Europe, it is replaced by the closely related Carrion Crow (Corvus corone) from which it was split in 2002 and was recognised as a separate species. Where their breeding ranges overlap, they may hybridise. Some of the northern populations are migratory and move south for the winter.
    
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Saturday, 29 November 2014

EURASIAN SPARROWHAWK (Accipiter nisus) female with freshly killed ROCK DOVE (Columba livia) Cape Clear Island, Baltimore, Co. Cork, Ireland


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The Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), alternative names include, Northern Sparrowhawk or simply Sparrowhawk, is a small bird of prey of the family Accipitridae which is in the genus Accipiter. It has a widespread distribution across the temperate and subtropical parts of the Old World. It is a partial migrant and in the more northern and colder parts of its range, it disperses south for the winter. The preferred habitats include open type wood land, hedge rows, parks and gardens where a wide variety of small to medium sized perching birds are preyed upon. Males are up to 25% smaller than females and tend to prey upon sparrow sized passerines but can include starlings and thrushes. Females, on the other hand, can tackle larger prey including doves, pigeons and magpies.

  Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Six subspecies are generally recognised:

  •  Accipiter nisus nisus - breeds from Europe and west Asia to western Siberia and Iran; northern populations winter south to the Mediterranean, north-east Africa, Arabia and Pakistan.
  •  Accipiter nisus nisosimilis - central and eastern Siberia east to Kamchatka and Japan, and south to northern China. This subspecies is wholly migratory, wintering from Pakistan and India eastwards through South-East Asia and southern China to Korea and Japan; some even reach Africa.
  •  Accipiter nisus melaschistos - Afghanistan through the Himalayas and southern Tibet to western China, and winters in the plains of South Asia.
  •   Accpiter nisus wolterstorffi - Sardinia and Corsica
  •  Accipiter nisus granti - Madeira and the Canary Islands.
  •  Accipiter nisus punicus - north-west Africa, north of the Sahara.
Reference
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_sparrowhawk


Saturday, 22 November 2014

HERMANN'S TORTOISE (Testudo hermanni subspecies T. h. boettgeri) Svilengrad, Haskovo Province, Bulgaria

 
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The Hermann's Tortoise (Testudo hermanniis) of the family Testudinidae which is in the genus Testudo. The Marginated Tortoise (Testudo marginata) and Spur-thighed Tortoise (Testudo graeca) are the only other species of tortoise native to Europe.

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Distribution map of Hermann's Tortoise showing subspecies
By Mkljun - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4820094
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0b/Testudo_hermanni_range_map.jpg 

Tuesday, 4 November 2014

EASTERN IMPERIAL EAGLE (Aquila heliaca) Svilengrad, Haskovo Province, Bulgaria

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The Eastern Imperial Eagle (Aquila heliaca) is of the family Accipitridae which is in the genus Aquila. This very large uncommon bird of prey which breeds in central and south eastern Europe as well as western and central Asia. The European population winters in north east Africa. The Asian population winters in the Middle East, northern Indian and South East Asia. Small numbers remain in the breeding areas all year round. Major prey items include hares, rabbits, susliks (a type of ground squirrel), birds and carrion. 
 
 Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Saturday, 25 October 2014

SARDINIAN WARBLER [Female] (Sylvia melanocephala subspecies S. m. melanocephala) Krumovitsa River, Krumovgrad, District Kardjali, Bulgaria


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The Sardinian Warbler (Sylvia melanocephala) is a small mainly insectivorous warbler of the family Sylviidae which is in the genus Sylvia. It is commonly encountered in southern and eastern Europe as well as in countries bordering the Mediterranean Basin. It is also resident on the Canary Islands. Some authorities recognise up to five subspecies. The female, typical of most sylvia warblers, has drabber plumage, it is grey headed with brownish upper parts and the under parts are washed buff. This species normally occurs in shrubby type habitat as well as in parks and gardens.
    Text © Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds.com 
Up to five subspecies are generally recognised:
  • Sylvia melanocephala melanocephala - Iberia across the northern Mediterranean to western Turkey. Extends into the Maghreb from Iberia, and into Libya from Italy via Sicily. Migrates to the Sahel and oases in the Sahara in winter.
  • Sylvia melanocephala leucogastra  - Canary Islands, resident, probably some vagrancy between eastern islands and Maghreb.
  • Sylvia melanocephala momus - Near East. Resident, some local movements. 
  • Sylvia melanocephala norissae - Fayyum Warbler - probably only a local morph of momus  - Nile Delta region. Extinct since around 1940.
  • Sylvia melanocephala valverdei - Morocco south to the Tropic of Cancer, inland to the edge of the Sahara. Resident, but some seasonal movements.
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinian_warbler

Sunday, 21 September 2014

Saturday, 13 September 2014

GLOSSY IBIS (Plegadis falcinellus) Lake Mandrensko, Burgas, Bulgaria


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The Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) is a large wading bird in the family Threskiornithidae which is in the genus Plegadis. The scientific name derives from Ancient Greek plegados and Latin falcis, both meaning sickle and referring to the distinctive shape of the bill.
 This is the most widespread ibis species, breeding in scattered sites in warm regions of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, as well as the Atlantic and Caribbean regions of the Americas. 
 This species is migratory, most European birds winter in Africa and in North America birds from north of the Carolinas winter farther south. Birds from other populations may disperse widely outside the breeding season.
 
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossy_ibis