Bird, bug, butterfly and a wild variety of photos from Belarus, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Scotland and Spain by Irish wildlife photographer Patrick J. O'Keeffe and invited guests

Showing posts with label Birds of Fingal. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Birds of Fingal. Show all posts

Thursday, 28 April 2022

BLACK TAILED GODWIT (Limosa limosa subspecies L .l. islandica) in transition to breeding plumage at The Big Marsh, Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Limosa. This large, long-legged and long-billed shorebird's breeding range extends from Iceland through central Europe as well as central and northeastern Asia. In the autumn, it migrates south to spend the winter in southern and western Europe, sub Saharan Africa, southern Asia and parts of coastal Australia. The species breeds in fens, damp meadows, moorlands and bogs. In the winter, it occurs on estuaries, lake shores, and in damp coastal fields.
 
There are three subspecies recognised; 
  •  Icelandic Black-tailed Godwit - (Limosa limosa islandica) 
  • European Black-tailed Godwit - (Limosa limosa limosa) 
  • Asian Black-tailed Godwit - (Limosa limosa melanuroides)

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Saturday, 23 April 2022

COMMON SANDPIPER (Actitis hypoleucos) at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) is a small shorebird or wader in the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Actitis. This Eurasian species is a summer resident that returns from its wintering areas in April. It breeds around fresh water lakes and has a scattered distribution that extends from the Atlantic coast of Europe to Eastern Asia. Unlike most other shorebirds or waders seen on passage, it does not occur in flocks, single individuals are normally encountered. It migrates south in late Summer to spend the winter in Africa, southern Asia and Australia. Small numbers over winter in western and southern Europe. 
The Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) is an almost identical species that is a summer resident in North America which winters in South America and to a lesser extent in parts of southern USA. It is a rare but annual vagrant in Europe. Remarkably in 1975, a pair attempted to breed on the Isle of Sky in Scotland but alas the eggs failed to hatch.
 
  Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Tuesday, 19 April 2022

ROCK PIPIT (Anthus petrosus) at Balscadden Beach, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Rock Pipit (Anthus petrosus) is of the family Motacillidae which is in the genus Anthus.

Sunday, 17 April 2022

ROCK PIPIT (Anthus petrosus) at Balscadden Beach, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Rock Pipit (Anthus petrosus) is of the family Motacillidae which is in the genus Anthus.

Wednesday, 13 April 2022

MEADOW PIPIT (Anthus pratensis) at Balscadden, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Meadow Pipit (Anthus pratensis) is of the family Motacillidae which is in the genus Anthus.

Monday, 11 April 2022

GREY HERON (Ardea cinerea) adult at Howth Harbour, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) is of the  family Ardeidae which is in the genus Ardea. It is resident in the temperate regions of Eurasia as well as parts of Africa. The more northern populations are migratory and move south for the winter. It occurs mainly in wetland habitats where a wide variety of aquatic creatures are preyed upon.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Saturday, 9 April 2022

RUDDY TURNSTONE (Arenaria interpres) at East Pier, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Arenaria.

Thursday, 7 April 2022

PIED WAGTAIL (Motacilla alba subspecies M. a. alba) female at Balscadden Beach, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The White Wagtail (Motacilla alba) is a small ground nesting passerine and along with the longclaws and pipits is in the family Motacillidae which is in the genus Motacilla. This species is the commonest and most widespread wagtail that is found in Eurasia. It also breeds in Morocco in North Africa and there is a small Alaskan breeding population in North America. The northern populations are migratory and winters in Southern Europe, Africa and Southern Asia. Up to 11 sub-species are recognised, including the Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba yarrellii) which breeds in Britain, Ireland and the near-continent.

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

PIED WAGTAIL (Motacilla alba subspecies M. a. yarrellii) male at Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Swords, Co. Dublin, Ireland

       

    WHITE WAGTAIL (Montacella alba) subspecies distribution map          

CLICK ON MAP TO ENLARGE

CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Sunday, 3 April 2022

EUROPEAN STONECHAT (Saxicola rubicola subspecies S. r. hibernans) male, drying out after a wash at Balscadden, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin


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The European Stonechat (Saxicola rubicola) is of the chat family Muscicapidae which is in the genus Saxicola. Preferred habitats include rough grassland, sand dunes and heathland where it is typically seen perched on brambles, gorse or shrubs within the breeding area. 
In the temperate part of its range, nesting commences in late March and up to three broods are raised. It is a partial migrant. Populations from the colder regions move to spend the winter in southern Europe and northern Africa. Successive hard winters, as was the case in 2009/10 and 2010/11 caused severe losses in the mainly sedentary northwestern populations
 
There are two subspecies generally recognised,  
  • Saxicola rubicola rubicola - occurs in central, eastern and southern Europe as well as northern Morocco and southeastern Turkey. 
  •  Saxicola rubicola hibernans - occurs in northwestern Europe including Britain, Ireland, France and Norway.
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Saturday, 2 April 2022

EUROPEAN SHAG (Gulosus aristotelis) at Howth Harbour, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

 
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The European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) is of the cormorant family Phalacrocoracidae which is in the genus Gulosus. It occurs in northern and western Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, parts of North Africa as well as parts of the Black Sea Coast. This species breeds in colonies on coastal rocky cliffs and on offshore islands. Can easily be confused with Greater Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) but unlike that species, it is very rarely found inland on lakes or rivers.
  
Three subspecies are generally recognised :
      • G. a. aristotelis – occurs in northwestern European Atlantic Ocean coasts
      • G. a. desmarestii – occurs in the Mediterranean Basin and Black Sea coasts
      • G. a. riggenbachi – occurs in northwestern African coasts
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) distribution map

 Breeding                  Non-breeding - winter 
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Thursday, 31 March 2022

BRENT GOOSE or PALE BELLIED BRENT GOOSE (Branta bernicla subspecies B. b. hrota) a family party, [two adults, 1st on left and 2nd right plus three 1st winters] at Howth Harbour, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Brent Goose (Branta bernicla), also known as Brant Goose in North America, is of the family Anatidae which is in the genus Branta.
 
There are three subspecies generally recognised:
        • Dark-bellied Brent Goose (B. b. bernicla) or Dark-bellied Brant in North America
        • Pale-bellied Brent Goose (B. b. hrota) or Atlantic Brant in North America
        • Black Brant Goose (B. b. nigricans) or the Pacific Brant in North America
It has also been suggested by some that the so called Grey-bellied Brent Goose be recognised as a subspecies. 

Patrick J.O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Tuesday, 29 March 2022

EUROPEAN ROBIN (Erithacus rubecula) at Turvey Nature Reserve, Donabate, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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 The European Robin (Erithacus rubecula) or more commonly known as a Robin is of the  family Muscicapidae which is in the genus Erithacus.

Thursday, 24 March 2022

COMMON PHEASANT or RING NECKED PHEASANT (Phasianus colchicus) at Turvey Nature Reserve, Donabate, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Common Pheasant or Ring Necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) is of the family Phasianidae which is in the genus Phasianus.

Tuesday, 22 March 2022

MISTLE THRUSH (Turdus viscivorus) feeding on Common Ivy (Hedera helix) berries at Turvey Nature Reserve, Donabate, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

 
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 The Mistle Thrush (Turdus viscivorus) is of the thrush family Turdidae which is in the genus Turdus.

Monday, 21 March 2022

MISTLE THRUSH (Turdus viscivorus) feeding on Common Ivy (Hedera helix) berries at Turvey Nature Reserve, Donabate, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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 The Mistle Thrush (Turdus viscivorus) is of the thrush family Turdidae which is in the genus Turdus.

Saturday, 12 March 2022

COMMON REDSHANK (Tringa totanus) feeding at low tide in the south east corner of Howth Harbour, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

 
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The Common Redshank (Tringa totanus) or more simply known as a Redshank is of the sandpiper family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Tringa.

 Common Redshank (Tringa totanus) distribution map
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7c/TringaTotanusIUCN2019_2.png
 
 Resident - year round  Breeding  Passage  Non-breeding - winter 
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Friday, 11 March 2022

BLACK REDSTART (Phoenicurus ochruros) immature at Balscadden Beach, Howth, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

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The Black Redstart
(Phoenicurus ochruros) is a small perching bird of the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae which is the genus Phoenicurus. It is a locally common resident in central and southern Europe as well as northern Africa. It also occurs in western and central Asia. In the warmer parts of its range it is sedentary. The northern populations migrate in the autumn to spend the winter in southern and western Europe, northern Africa and the Indian sub continent. 
 In Ireland, it is a very uncommon spring and autumn passage migrant, in addition very small numbers overwinter at traditional coastal locations.

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Thursday, 24 February 2022

EUROPEAN SHAG (Gulosus aristotelis) at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

 
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Click external link here for detailed species information
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The European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) is of the cormorant family Phalacrocoracidae which is in the genus Gulosus. It occurs in northern and western Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, parts of North Africa as well as parts of the Black Sea Coast. This species breeds in colonies on coastal rocky cliffs and on offshore islands. Can easily be confused with Greater Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) but unlike that species, it is very rarely found inland on lakes or rivers.
  
Three subspecies are generally recognised :
      • G. a. aristotelis – occurs in northwestern European Atlantic Ocean coasts
      • G. a. desmarestii – occurs in the Mediterranean Basin and Black Sea coasts
      • G. a. riggenbachi – occurs in northwestern African coasts
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) distribution map

 Breeding                  Non-breeding - winter 
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday, 23 February 2022

EUROPEAN SHAG (Gulosus aristotelis) with a European Flounder (Platichthys flesus) at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

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Click external link here for detailed species information
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The European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) is of the cormorant family Phalacrocoracidae which is in the genus Gulosus. This species breeds in colonies on coastal rocky cliffs and offshore islands. It occurs in northern and western Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, parts of North Africa as well as parts of the Black Sea Coast. Can easily be confused with Greater Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) but unlike that species, it's very rarely found inland on lakes or rivers.
 
Three subspecies are generally recognised :
      • G. a. aristotelis – occurs in northwestern European Atlantic Ocean coasts
      • G. a. desmarestii – occurs in the Mediterranean Basin and Black Sea coasts
      • G. a. riggenbachi – occurs in northwestern African coasts
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) distribution map

 Breeding                  Non-breeding - winter 
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Monday, 21 February 2022

EUROPEAN SHAG (Gulosus aristotelis) at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

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Click external link here for detailed species information
Click external link here to see distribution map and to hear calls
 
The European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) is of the cormorant family Phalacrocoracidae which is in the genus Gulosus. It occurs in northern and western Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, parts of North Africa as well as parts of the Black Sea Coast. This species breeds in colonies on coastal rocky cliffs and on offshore islands. Can easily be confused with Greater Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) but unlike that species, it is very rarely found inland on lakes or rivers.
  
Three subspecies are generally recognised :
      • G. a. aristotelis – occurs in northwestern European Atlantic Ocean coasts
      • G. a. desmarestii – occurs in the Mediterranean Basin and Black Sea coasts
      • G. a. riggenbachi – occurs in northwestern African coasts
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) distribution map

 Breeding                  Non-breeding - winter 
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons