Bird, bug, butterfly and a wild variety of photos from Belarus, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Scotland and Spain by Irish wildlife photographer Patrick J. O'Keeffe and invited guests

Showing posts with label shorebirds. Show all posts
Showing posts with label shorebirds. Show all posts

Wednesday, 10 November 2021

SANDERLING (Calidris alba) at Blacksod Lighthouse, Belmullet Peninsula, Co. Mayo, Ireland

 
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The Sanderling (Calidris alba) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Calidris. It breeds in the Arctic tundra regions of North America and Asia. This small shorebird winters on the coastal beaches of southern North America, South America, Western Europe, Africa, southern Asia and Australia. It also occurs as a spring and autumn passage migrant at inland locations.
  
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Friday, 8 October 2021

SOLITARY SANDPIPER (Tringa solitaria) juvenile from 1st to 8th October 2021 found by Derek Charles and Majella Charles [data per www.irishbirding.com] at Clogher, Belmullet Peninsula, Co. Mayo, Ireland

 

 

 

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 The Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Tringa. This is a long distance migratory shorebird that breeds in the northern forests of Alaska, USA and Canada. It is also a very rare autumn passage vagrant to Western Europe. In mid autumn it moves south to spend the winter in Central and Southern America as well as the Caribbean. 

  This is the 2nd Co. Mayo Record and the 7 previous Irish Records are listed below:

  •   Co. Kerry - (juvenile) 21 to 22-09-1968 at Akeragh Lough    
  •   Co. Cork - (juvenile) 05 to 07-09-1971 at Lissergriffin 
  •   Co. Cork - (juvenile) 15 to 17-09-1974 in a flooded field near O'Driscoll's Castle, Cape Clear Island
  •   Co. Cork - (juvenile) 27 to 30-08-2008 flew over Lough Errul and then along the track at Central Bog, Cape Clear Island
  •   Co. Mayo - (juvenile) 22-09-2009 at Annagh Head and at Termoncarragh Lake
  •   Co. Wexford - (juvenile) 06 to 14-10-2014 at Duncormick, Rathangan and The Cull
  •   Co. Clare - (adult) 15 to 18-08-2016 at Cloghaun Lough, near Kilbaha
  
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Reference:
  A List of Irish Birds, version 11.0 by Joe Hobbs (download pdf here)
 
Geographical distribution map of Solitary sandpiper
 
Tringa solitaria map.svg
  Breeding   Migration   winter

By Cephas - Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria), In Neotropical Birds Online (T. S. Schulenberg, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. retrieved from Neotropical Birds Online: https://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/Species-Account/nb/species/solsan, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=69875049

Thursday, 7 October 2021

FAEROE SNIPE (Gallinago gallinago subspecies G. g. faeroeensis) at Cartron, Belmullet Peninsula, Co. Mayo, Ireland



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 The Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Gallinago. It breeds in temperate regions of Eurasia. In the colder parts of its range, populations are migratory and move south to spend the winter in southern Eurasia as well as parts of northern and sub Saharan Africa.
There are two subspecies recognised, Common Snipe (G. g. gallinago) and Faeroe Snipe (G. g. faeroeensis) which breeds in Iceland, Orkney, Shetland as well as the Faeroes and has russet brown plumage tones. Wilson's Snipe (Gallinago delicata) which occurs in the Americas was formally regarded as a subspecies of Common Snipe but since 2003 it has been upgraded to full species status.
 
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Wednesday, 6 October 2021

COMMON SNIPE (Gallinago gallinago) showing some characteristics of Faeroe Snipe (Gallinago gallinago subspecies G. g. faeroeensis) at Cartron, Belmullet Peninsula, Co. Mayo, Ireland

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 The Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Gallinago. It breeds in temperate regions of Eurasia. In the colder parts of its range, populations are migratory and move south to spend the winter in southern Eurasia as well as parts of northern and sub Saharan Africa.
There are two subspecies recognised, Common Snipe (G. g. gallinago) and Faeroe Snipe (G. g. faeroeensis) which breeds in Iceland, Orkney, Shetland as well as the Faeroes and has russet brown plumage tones. Wilson's Snipe (Gallinago delicata) which occurs in the Americas was formally regarded as a subspecies of Common Snipe but since 2003 it has been upgraded to full species status.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds    
 
 Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) distribution map  
 
GallinagoGallinagoIUCNver2019-2.png
 Breeding            Resident          Winter
 
By SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy. CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=81451030

Tuesday, 5 October 2021

COMMON SNIPE (Gallinago gallinago subspecies G. g. gallinago) juvenile at Cartron, Belmullet Peninsula, Co. Mayo, Ireland


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 The Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Gallinago. It breeds in temperate regions of Eurasia. In the colder parts of its range, populations are migratory and move south to spend the winter in southern Eurasia as well as parts of northern and sub Saharan Africa.
There are two subspecies recognised, Common Snipe (G. g. gallinago) and Faeroe Snipe (G. g. faeroeensis) which breeds in Iceland, Orkney, Shetland as well as the Faeroes and has russet brown plumage tones. Wilson's Snipe (Gallinago delicata) which occurs in the Americas was formally regarded as a subspecies of Common Snipe but since 2003 it has been upgraded to full species status.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds    
 
 Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago) distribution map  
 
GallinagoGallinagoIUCNver2019-2.png
 Breeding            Resident          Winter
 
By SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy. CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=81451030

Thursday, 23 September 2021

RUDDY TURNSTONE (Arenaria interpres) in transition to winter plumage Blacksod Lighthouse, Belmullet Peninsula, Co. Mayo, Ireland


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The Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Arenaria.

Saturday, 18 September 2021

COMMON RINGED PLOVER (Charadrius hiaticula) adult in the foreground and juvenile Blacksod Lighthouse, Belmullet Peninsula, Co. Mayo, Ireland

 
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 The Common Ringed Plover (Charadrius hiaticula) is of the family Charadriidae which is in the genus Charadrius.

Friday, 17 September 2021

COMMON RINGED PLOVER (Charadrius hiaticula) adult Blacksod Lighthouse, Belmullet Peninsula, Co. Mayo, Ireland


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 The Common Ringed Plover (Charadrius hiaticula) is of the family Charadriidae which is in the genus Charadrius.

Thursday, 16 September 2021

COMMON RINGED PLOVER (Charadrius hiaticula) juvenile Blacksod Lighthouse, Belmullet Peninsula, Co. Mayo, Ireland


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 The Common Ringed Plover (Charadrius hiaticula) is of the family Charadriidae which is in the genus Charadrius.

Sunday, 22 August 2021

EURASIAN WHIMBREL (Numenius phaeopus) Rogerstown Estuary, Rush, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Eurasian Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) is of the curlew family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Numenius.

Wednesday, 12 May 2021

RUDDY TURNSTONE (Arenaria interpres) in transition from winter to summer plumage, Skerries Harbour, Skerries, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Arenaria.

Sunday, 2 May 2021

EURASIAN WHIMBREL (Numenius phaeopus) this straggler was part of a fly over flock of 27 on 1st May, Turvey Nature Reserve, Donabate, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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 The Eurasian Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) is of the curlew family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Numenius.

Tuesday, 16 February 2021

EURASIAN CURLEW (Numenius arquata) Turvey Nature Reserve, Donabate, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


 
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 The Eurasian Curlew (Numenius arquata) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Numenius.

Friday, 13 March 2020

RED KNOT [winter plumage] (Calidris canutus) Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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A small flock of Red Knot (Calidris canutus) in flight over the Big Marsh at the western end of the Broadmeadow Estuary, Fingal, Dublin, Ireland

Thursday, 13 February 2020

COMMON GREENSHANK (Tringa nebularia) Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

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The Common Greenshank (Tringa nebularia) is a wader or shorebird of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Tringa. The breeding range extends from northern Scotland eastwards across northern Europe and Asia. This migratory species winters in sub Saharan Africa, the Indian subcontinent and Australasia. In addition, small numbers overwinter along the coasts of northwest Africa and northwest Europe.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Sunday, 23 June 2019

RED NECKED PHALAROPE (Phalaropus lobatus) female Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) is a small sandpiper type shorebird of the family Scolopacidae and is one of the three species of phalarope in the genus Phalaropus. It is a long distance migrant, breeding in the Arctic tundra regions of North America and Eurasia and wintering at sea on tropical oceans. The small British population, which has recently increase to c60 pairs, is mainly confined to the Shetland Isles and the Outer Hebrides as well as occasionally breeding on the Scottish Mainland. Formally up to to 50 pairs bred in Ireland then this population declined with no proof of breeding since the early 1970s, although breeding has been suspected on a number of occasions. Thanks to a program of habitat improve by BirdWatch Ireland, a handful of birds have recommenced breeding at one protected site in County Mayo.
There are three previous Co.Dublin records: 30-09-1954 (West Pier, Dun Laoghaire), 19-12-1956 (North Bull Island) and  08 to 10-09-1957 (Bootherstown Marsh)

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
Reference:
A List of Some Rarer Birds in Dublin version 5.2 - Joe Hobbs (download pdf here)

Saturday, 25 November 2017

RUFF (Calidris pugnax) Adult male, Rogerstown Estuary, Rush, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Ruff (Calidris pugnax) is a medium sized shorebird or wader of the sandpiper family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Calidris.

Thursday, 23 November 2017

RUFF (Calidris pugnax) Juvenile plumage, Rogerstown Estuary, Rush, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Ruff (Calidris pugnax) is a medium sized shorebird or wader of the sandpiper family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Calidris.

Thursday, 14 September 2017

BLACK TAILED GODWIT [Juvenile] (Limosa limosa subspecie. L .l. islandica) Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa) is a large, long-legged and long-billed shorebird in the family Scolopacidae which is the genus Limosa. There are three subspecies recognised, Icelandic, European and Asian Black-tailed Godwit. The breeding range stretches from Iceland through Europe and central Asia. They winter in the Indian Subcontinent, Australia, western Europe and west Africa. The species breeds in fens, lake edges, damp meadows, moorlands and bogs and uses estuaries, swamps and flooded fields in winter. The world population is estimated to be 634,000 to 805,000 birds and is classified as Near Threatened.

Source : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black-tailed_godwit