Bird, bug, butterfly and a wild variety of photos from Belarus, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Scotland and Spain by Irish wildlife photographer Patrick J. O'Keeffe and invited guests

Showing posts with label Broadmeadow Estuary. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Broadmeadow Estuary. Show all posts

Wednesday, 4 May 2022

BLACK LEGGED KITTIWAKE (Rissa tridactyla)[from 3rd to 8th May 2022] in 1st summer/ 2nd calandar year plumage at the Horse Marsh, Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland




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The Black-legged Kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) is of the gull family Laridae which is in the genus Rissa. The only other member of the genus Rissa is the Red-legged Kittiwake (Rissa brevirostris) where less than 200,000 pairs breed on some of the Bering Sea Islands between Russia and Alaska,USA.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe /Raw Birds

Tuesday, 3 May 2022

LITTLE GULL (Hydrocoloeus minutus) [from 1st to 6th May 2022] in 1st summer/ 2nd calendar year plumage at the Horse Marsh, Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

 Little Gull (Hydrocoloeus minutus) in 1st summer/ 2nd calendar year plumage.

 Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus) on the left and Little Gull (Hydrocoloeus minutus), both in 1st summer/ 2nd calendar year plumage.

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The Little Gull (Hydrocoloeus minutus) is of the family Laridae which is in the genus Hydrocoloeus.

Thursday, 28 April 2022

GADWALL (Mareca strepera) female at the Horse Marsh, Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Gadwall (Mareca strepera) is a dabbling duck of the family Anatidae which is in the genus Mareca.

Wednesday, 27 April 2022

GADWALL (Mareca strepera) male at the Horse Marsh, Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Gadwall (Mareca strepera) is a dabbling duck of the family Anatidae which is in the genus Mareca.

Tuesday, 26 April 2022

GADWALL (Mareca strepera) pair at the Horse Marsh, Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Gadwall (Mareca strepera) is a dabbling duck of the family Anatidae which is in the genus Mareca.

Monday, 25 April 2022

BLACK TAILED GODWIT (Limosa limosa subspecies L .l. islandica) immature at the Horse Marsh, Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Limosa. This large, long-legged and long-billed shorebird's breeding range extends from Iceland through central Europe as well as central and northeastern Asia. In the autumn, it migrates south to spend the winter in southern and western Europe, Mediterranean Basin, sub Saharan Africa, southern Asia and parts of coastal Australia. The species breeds in fens, damp meadows, moorlands and bogs. In the winter, it occurs on estuaries, lake shores, and in damp coastal fields.
 
There are three subspecies recognised:
  • Icelandic Black-tailed Godwit - (Limosa limosa islandica) 
  • European Black-tailed Godwit - (Limosa limosa limosa) 
  • Asian Black-tailed Godwit - (Limosa limosa melanuroides)
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa) distribution map
 
LimosalimosaWorldDistribution.jpg
Yellow breeding     Blue wintering     Green breeding resident
 
J. Schroeder, CC BY-SA 2.5 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5>, via Wikimedia Commons

Sunday, 24 April 2022

BLACK TAILED GODWIT (Limosa limosa subspecies L .l. islandica) adult in transition to breeding plumage at the Horse Marsh, Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa) is of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Limosa. This large, long-legged and long-billed shorebird's breeding range extends from Iceland through central Europe as well as central and northeastern Asia. In the autumn, it migrates south to spend the winter in southern and western Europe, Mediterranean Basin, sub Saharan Africa, southern Asia and parts of coastal Australia. The species breeds in fens, damp meadows, moorlands and bogs. In the winter, it occurs on estuaries, lake shores, and in damp coastal fields. 
 
There are three subspecies recognised:
  • Icelandic Black-tailed Godwit - (Limosa limosa islandica) 
  • European Black-tailed Godwit - (Limosa limosa limosa) 
  • Asian Black-tailed Godwit - (Limosa limosa melanuroides)

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa) distribution map
 
LimosalimosaWorldDistribution.jpg
Yellow breeding     Blue wintering     Green breeding resident
 
J. Schroeder, CC BY-SA 2.5 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5>, via Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday, 20 April 2022

COMMON SANDPIPER (Actitis hypoleucos) at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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The Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) is a small shorebird or wader in the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Actitis. This Eurasian species is a summer resident that returns from its wintering areas in April. It breeds around fresh water lakes and has a scattered distribution that extends from the Atlantic coast of Europe to Eastern Asia. Unlike most other shorebirds or waders seen on passage, it does not occur in flocks, single individuals are normally encountered. It migrates south in late Summer to spend the winter in Africa, southern Asia and Australia. Small numbers over winter in western and southern Europe. 
The Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) is an almost identical species that is a summer resident in North America which winters in South America and to a lesser extent in parts of southern USA. It is a rare but annual vagrant in Europe. Remarkably in 1975, a pair attempted to breed on the Isle of Sky in Scotland but alas the eggs failed to hatch.
 
  Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Thursday, 24 February 2022

EUROPEAN SHAG (Gulosus aristotelis) at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

 
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The European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) is of the cormorant family Phalacrocoracidae which is in the genus Gulosus. It occurs in northern and western Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, parts of North Africa as well as parts of the Black Sea Coast. This species breeds in colonies on coastal rocky cliffs and on offshore islands. Can easily be confused with Greater Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) but unlike that species, it is very rarely found inland on lakes or rivers.
  
Three subspecies are generally recognised :
      • G. a. aristotelis – occurs in northwestern European Atlantic Ocean coasts
      • G. a. desmarestii – occurs in the Mediterranean Basin and Black Sea coasts
      • G. a. riggenbachi – occurs in northwestern African coasts
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) distribution map

 Breeding                  Non-breeding - winter 
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday, 23 February 2022

EUROPEAN SHAG (Gulosus aristotelis) with a European Flounder (Platichthys flesus) at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

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The European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) is of the cormorant family Phalacrocoracidae which is in the genus Gulosus. This species breeds in colonies on coastal rocky cliffs and offshore islands. It occurs in northern and western Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, parts of North Africa as well as parts of the Black Sea Coast. Can easily be confused with Greater Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) but unlike that species, it's very rarely found inland on lakes or rivers.
 
Three subspecies are generally recognised :
      • G. a. aristotelis – occurs in northwestern European Atlantic Ocean coasts
      • G. a. desmarestii – occurs in the Mediterranean Basin and Black Sea coasts
      • G. a. riggenbachi – occurs in northwestern African coasts
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) distribution map

 Breeding                  Non-breeding - winter 
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Monday, 21 February 2022

EUROPEAN SHAG (Gulosus aristotelis) at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland

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Click external link here for detailed species information
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The European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) is of the cormorant family Phalacrocoracidae which is in the genus Gulosus. It occurs in northern and western Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, parts of North Africa as well as parts of the Black Sea Coast. This species breeds in colonies on coastal rocky cliffs and on offshore islands. Can easily be confused with Greater Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) but unlike that species, it is very rarely found inland on lakes or rivers.
  
Three subspecies are generally recognised :
      • G. a. aristotelis – occurs in northwestern European Atlantic Ocean coasts
      • G. a. desmarestii – occurs in the Mediterranean Basin and Black Sea coasts
      • G. a. riggenbachi – occurs in northwestern African coasts
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
European Shag (Gulosus aristotelis) distribution map

 Breeding                  Non-breeding - winter 
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Friday, 18 February 2022

EURASIAN SISKIN (Spinus spinus) female at Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Dublin, Ireland


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 The Eurasian Siskin (Spinus spinus) is of the family Fringillidae which is in the genus Spinus.

Eurasian Siskin (Spinus spinus) distribution map

Breeding      Resident      Non breeding - winter
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Sunday, 13 February 2022

EURASIAN SISKIN (Spinus spinus) male at Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Dublin, Ireland


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 The Eurasian Siskin (Spinus spinus) is of the family Fringillidae which is in the genus Spinus.

Eurasian Siskin (Spinus spinus) distribution map

Breeding      Resident      Non breeding - winter
 
SanoAK: Alexander Kürthy, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Monday, 7 February 2022

ICELAND GULL (Larus glaucoides) 2nd winter from 31st January to at least 1st February 2022 at Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland



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The Iceland Gull (Larus glaucoides) is of the family Laridae which is in the genus Larus.

Iceland Gull (Larus glaucoides) distribution map

   Breeding   Passage   Non breeding-winter   Non breeding-scarce winter
 
Cephas, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday, 2 February 2022

GREAT CORMORANT (Phalacrocorax carbo subspecies P. c. carbo) immature at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland



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 The Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) is of the family Phalacrocoracidae which is in the genus Phalacrocorax. It has a scattered distribution in parts of North America, Eurasia, Africa and Australasia. 
There are a number subspecies recognised including the ground nesting Common Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo carbo) which occurs in Britain and Ireland that breeds on coastal rocky outcrops and on off shore islands.  The tree nesting Continental Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis) which breeds in Northern Europe extending eastwards to Japan, but has in recent times colonised parts of southern Britain. This is apparently a rare subspecies in Ireland with less than 70 records but is in all probability under recorded.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Sunday, 30 January 2022

GREATER SCAUP (Aythya marila) female at Broadmeadow Estuary, Malahide, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland



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The Greater Scaup (Aythya marila) is of the family Anatidae which is in the genus Aythya. This diving duck breeds in the arctic regions of North America and Eurasia. In late autumn it migrates south to spend the winter in the southern parts of its range along coasts as well as on ice free lakes and lagoons. In North America, it can be confused with Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) and similarly in Eurasia with Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula), especially in the case of females or immatures. 
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds 
 
Greater Scaup (Aythya marila) distribution map
 

Breeding           Non breeding - winter

UND77, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons