Bird, bug, butterfly and a wild variety of photos from Belarus, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Scotland and Spain by Irish wildlife photographer Patrick J. O'Keeffe and invited guests

Showing posts with label Hoverflies of Ireland. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hoverflies of Ireland. Show all posts

Wednesday, 25 August 2021

PALE SADDLED LEUCOZONA HOVERFLY (Leucozona glaucia) female Abbeyleix Bog, Abbeyleix, Co. Laois, Ireland



CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click external link here for detailed species information
 
The Pale Saddled Leucozona Hoverfly (Leucozona glaucia) is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Leucozona. This Palearctic species has a scattered and local distribution in Ireland.The flight season is from early May to mid September. The larval food source are aphids. The pollen eating adults are commonly found on umbellifer plants.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds  
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Friday, 20 August 2021

BATMAN HOVERFLY (Myathropa florea) female Curraghchase Forest Park, Co. Limerick, Ireland


CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click external link here for detailed species information
 
The Batman Hoverfly (Myathropa florea) is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Myathropa. This common species occurs in Europe as well as  parts of North Africia.The flight season is from from mid April to late October. Even darker individuals show the diagnostic "batman logo" shape on the lower half of the  thorax and hence its common name.
 
 
Tapered Dronefly (Eristalis pertinax) or Tapered Hoverfly male on left and Batman Hoverfly (Myathropa florea) female nectering on Common Blackberry flowers  (Rubus fruticosus).
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds  
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Thursday, 19 August 2021

FURRY HOVERFLY or FURRY DRONEFLY (Eristalis intricaria) female Curraghchase Forest Park, Co. Limerick, Ireland


CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click external link here for detailed species information
Click external link here for Ireland and European distribution maps
 
The Furry Hoverfly (Eristalis intricaria) or Furry Dronefly is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Eristalis. This sexually diamorphic ( and have different characteristics) European species is on the wing from April to September. Males in particular need to be separated with care from other hoverfly bumblebee mimics. Id feature; hind legs dark with partially pale tibiae.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds  
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Saturday, 14 August 2021

TAPERED DRONEFLY or TAPERED HOVERFLY (Eristalis pertinax) Girley Bog, Natural Heritage Area (NHA), Scurlockstown, Kells, Co. Meath, Ireland

 
 
CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click external link here for detailed species information
 
The Tapered Dronefly (Eristalis pertinax) or Tapered Hoverfly is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Eristalis. This hoverfly is commonly found in Europe. It has a long flight season over a number of generations which extends from February to early November and overwinters as an adult. Key identification features include: large size, distinctive genus wing pattern, tapered abdomen, black antennae, yellowish front and middle lower legs (tarsi).

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Monday, 14 June 2021

COMMON SNOUT HOVERFLY (Rhingia campestris) female, Girley Bog, Natural Heritage Area (NHA), Scurlockstown, Co. Meath, Ireland


CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click here for detailed species information
 
The Common Snout Hoverfly (Rhingia campestris) is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Rhingia. It commonly occurs in the Palaearctic region. The flight season is from late March to mid November and there are two generations. This is a very striking species with a long snout and its larvae are found in dung or silage.

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Sunday, 9 May 2021

TAPERED DRONEFLY or TAPERED HOVERFLY (Eristalis pertinax) Turvey Nature Reserve, Donabate, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click external link here for detailed species information
 
The Tapered Dronefly (Eristalis pertinax) or Tapered Hoverfly is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Eristalis. This hoverfly is commonly found in Europe. It has a long flight season over a number of generations which extends from February to early November and overwinters as an adult. Key identification features include: large size, distinctive genus wing pattern, tapered abdomen, black antennae, yellowish front and middle lower legs (tarsi).

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Saturday, 1 May 2021

BLOTCH WINGED HOVERFLY (Leucozoba lucorum) male, Turvey Nature Reserve, Donabate, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland



CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click here for detailed species information

Click here to see a Beginners Guide to Irish Hoverflies 
 
The Blotch winged Hoverfly (Helophilus pendulus) is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Helophilus. This is a very distinctive species that mimics the Common Carder Bumblebee (Bombus pascuorum). Orange hairs on the thorax and an orange yellow scutellum are among the features that help separate it from Volucella hoverflies. In Ireland the normal flight season extends from May to August.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Thursday, 29 April 2021

THE FOOTBALLER HOVERFLY (Helophilus pendulus) female, Turvey Nature Reserve, Donabate, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


 CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click here for detailed species information

Click here to see a Beginners Guide to Irish Hoverflies 
 
The Footballer Hoverfly (Helophilus pendulus) is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Helophilus. This is a common species which occurs in a variety of habitats including gardens and parks. The pattern of black on the hind leg are among the features which help separate it from other Helophilus hoverflies. In Ireland it is on the wing from mid April until late October.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Saturday, 21 November 2020

YELLOW BARRED BOG HOVERFLY (Sericomyia silentis) on Blackberry Plant (Rubus fruticosus aggregate) Lullymore West Bog, Lullymore, Co. Kildare, Ireland




CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click here for detailed
Yellow-barred Bog Hoverfly information
Click here for detailed Blackberry Plant information
 
The Yellow-barred Bog Hoverfly (Sericomyia silentis) or Bog Hoverfly is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Sericomyia.
The Blackberry Plant (Rubus fruticosus aggregate) is of the family Rosaceae which is in the genus Rubus.
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Tuesday, 15 September 2020

TAPERED DRONEFLY / TAPERED HOVERFLY (Eristalis pertinax) female, Lullymore West Bog, Lullymore, Co. Kildare, Ireland


CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click external link here for detailed species information
 
The Tapered Dronefly (Eristalis pertinax) or Tapered Hoverfly is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Eristalis. This hoverfly is commonly found in Europe. It has a long flight season over a number of generations which extends from February to early November and overwinters as an adult. Key identification features include: large size, distinctive genus wing pattern, tapered abdomen, black antennae, yellowish front and middle lower legs (tarsi).

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Thursday, 3 September 2020

THE FOOTBALLER HOVERFLY (Helophilus pendulus) male, Lullymore West Bog, Lullymore, Co. Kildare, Ireland



CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click here for detailed species information

The Footballer Hoverfly (Helophilus pendulus) is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Helophilus.
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Friday, 7 August 2020

TWO BANDED WASP HOVERFLY [Female] (Chrysotoxum bicinctum) Lullymore West Bog, Lullymore, Co. Kildare, Ireland


CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click here for detailed species information

The Two Banded Wasp Hoverfly (Chrysotoxum bicinctum)  is of the family Syrphidaeum which is in the genus Chrysotoxum.
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Tuesday, 4 August 2020

YELLOW BARRED BOG HOVERFLY (Sericomyia silentis) [Male wing stretching] Lullymore West Bog, Lullymore, Co. Kildare, Ireland


CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click here for detailed species information
 
The Yellow-barred Bog Hoverfly (Sericomyia silentis) or Bog Hoverfly is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Sericomyia.
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Thursday, 9 July 2020

PELLUCID FLY [Female] (Volucella pellucens) Lullymore West Bog, IPCC Nature Reserve, Lullymore, Co. Kildare, Ireland


CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click here for detailed species information
The Pellucid Fly (Volucella pellucens), also known as Pellucid Hoverfly or Great Pied Hoverfly, is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Volucella. This bee mimic occurs in much of the Palearctic region, including Britain and Ireland. It is one of the larger species of hoverfly and the flight season is from May to October. 
The female lays her eggs in the nests of either the Common Wasp (Vespula vulgaris) or the German Wasp (Vespula germanica). When the larvae hatch they feed on nest debris which includes dead wasps and grubs. The larvae overwinter in the nest and emerge as adults in early summer.

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Reference and highly recommended reading:
 Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Friday, 3 July 2020

COMMON SNOUT HOVERFLY (Rhingia campestris) female, Lullymore West Bog, IPCC Nature Reserve, Lullymore, Co. Kildare, Ireland

CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click here for detailed species information
The Common Snout Hoverfly (Rhingia campestris) is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Rhingia. It commonly occurs in the Palaearctic region. The flight season is from late March to mid November and there are two generations. This is a very striking species with a long snout and its larvae are found in dung or silage.

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Reference and highly recommended reading: 
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris

Tuesday, 23 June 2020

TAPERED DRONEFLY or TAPERED HOVERFLY (Eristalis pertinax) Lullymore West Bog, IPCC Nature Reserve, Lullymore, Co. Kildare, Ireland


CLICK ON PHOTO TO SEE HIGHER QUALITY IMAGE
Click external link here for detailed species information
 
The Tapered Dronefly (Eristalis pertinax) or Tapered Hoverfly is of the family Syrphidae which is in the genus Eristalis. This hoverfly is commonly found in Europe. It has a long flight season over a number of generations which extends from February to early November and overwinters as an adult. Key identification features include: large size, distinctive genus wing pattern, tapered abdomen, black antennae, yellowish front and middle lower legs (tarsi).

Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds
 
Reference and highly recommended reading:
Britain's Hoverflies A field guide 2nd edition Stuart Ball and Roger Morris