Bird, bug, butterfly and a wild variety of photos from Belarus, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Scotland and Spain by Irish wildlife photographer Patrick J. O'Keeffe and invited guests

Showing posts with label Betancuria. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Betancuria. Show all posts

Saturday, 25 July 2015

CANARY ISLANDS CANDLE PLANT (Kleinia neriifolia) Barranco de Betancuria, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain


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There are nearly 1300 species of plant found on the Canary Islands but fewer than 800 of these occur on Fuerteventura Island. The Canary Islands Candle Plant (Kleinia neriifolia) is one of 43 plants that are endemic, 13 of which are confined to Fuerteventura. This perennial succulent is found in scrubby semi-arid type habitat and can grow up to 3 meters in height. Also known variously as Mountain Grass, Verode or Berode. Its Spanish name is Vero de Canarias. Text © www.rawbirds.com

Wednesday, 1 July 2015

COMMON BLUE BUTTERFLY [Male] (Polyommatus icarus) Barranco de Betancuria, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain


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The Common Blue (Polyommatus icarus) is a small butterfly in the family Lycaenidae. It occurs throughout the temperate regions of Europe (including The Canary Islands) Asia and North Africa. In Europe, it is absent from Iceland, the Atlantic islands of Madeira and the Azores. As its name implies it is one of the most widespread and commonly encountered blue butterflies in the Palaerarctic  region. In 2005, it was discovered breeding in Mirabel, Quebec, Canada and it has since increased its distribution there. In southern Europe, it is on the wing from late March to early November but it has a shorter  flight (May to September) season in the northern parts of its range.  
Text © www.rawbirds.com

Tuesday, 28 April 2015

TRUMPETER FINCH (Male) (Bucanetes githagineus subspecies B. g. amantum) Las Parcelas, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

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The Trumpeter Finch (Bucanetes githagineus) occurs mainly in North West Africa and the Middle East. There is a small breeding population in South East Spain and it has recently expanded its breeding range into Turkey. This stocky, heavy billed finch is normally found in arid, stony, semi desert type habitat. Bucanetes githagineus subspecies B. g. amantum is endemic to the Canary Islands and is one of four subspecies recognised. On Fuerteventura, the track which runs alongside the goat farm at Las Parcelas and the surrounding plain are well-known area for them. Trumpeter Finches normally occur in small flocks but become dispersive during the breeding season (April) and they then can be difficult to locate. This striking male is in full breeding plumage.  Text © www.rawbirds.com

Sunday, 26 April 2015

TRUMPETER FINCH (Female) (Bucanetes githagineus subspecies B. g. amantum) Las Parcelas, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

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The Trumpeter Finch (Bucanetes githagineus) occurs mainly in North West Africa and the Middle East. There is a small breeding population in South East Spain and it has recently expanded its breeding range into Turkey. This stocky, heavy billed finch is normally found in arid, stony, semi desert type habitat. Bucanetes githagineus subspecies B. g. amantum is endemic to the Canary Islands and is one of four subspecies recognised. On Fuerteventura, the track which runs alongside the goat farm at Las Parcelas and the surrounding plain are well-known area for them. Trumpeter Finches normally occur in small flocks but become dispersive during the breeding season (April) and they then can be difficult to locate. The female depicted here is collecting goat hairs presumably as nest lining material. Text © www.rawbirds.com

Saturday, 21 March 2015

EUROPEAN TURTLE DOVE (Streptopelia turtur) Barranco de Betancuria, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

 

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The European Turtle Dove (Streptopelia turtur) is a migratory member of the genus Columbidae, which includes doves and pigeons. It is a  summer breeding resident in Europe (including the Canary Islands), parts of the Middle East, as well as western Asia and north Africa. It is absent as a breeding species from Iceland, Ireland (formally bred) and most of Scandinavia but does occur in spring and autumn as an uncommon/rare overshooting migrant. Over much of its northern range, there has been a very sharp decline in its population. In the autumn, it migrates south to spend the winter in southern Africa.
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Friday, 13 March 2015

EURASIAN KESTREL (Falco tinnunculus subspecies F. t. dacotiae) male with freshly killed ATLANTIC LIZARD (Gallotia atlantica), Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

 
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The Eurasian Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) is a small bird of prey of the family Falconidae which is in the genus Falco. Alternative names include European Kestrel, Common Kestrel or simply referred to as a Kestrel.

Sunday, 15 February 2015

LOS MOLINOS RESERVOIR Las Parcelas, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain.


Detailed site information below
 
Just west of the scattered village of Las Parcelas, on the FV-221, there is a sharp bend in the road. At this bend, turn left at the goat farm building onto a 2km long driveable track which leads south to the car parking area at Los Molinos reservoir and dam. This track runs parallel to the Barranco de las Molinos (barranco - meaning dry river valley) which is on the right where the endemic Fuerteventura Chat (Saxicola dacotiae) can be found. On the left of the track is an extensive stony semi-arid plain which is home to most of Fuerteventura’s much sought after desert species.  This reservoir, with its permanent stand of fresh water, is a good place to see a variety of water birds, which includes Ruddy Shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea), Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopusand) and Little Egret (Egretta garzetta). Other birds, including some very rare species, are also attracted to the area during the spring/autumn migration period and during the winter months. This is the best location to see Plain Swift (Apus unicolor) and is joined by Pallid Swift (Apus pallidus) from March to October. The reservoir’s western side is inaccessible. On the eastern side, good views of the entire area can be had at the small bird hide (alas never open) which is located about 300m south of the car park. Due to the steep nature of its sides, access to the shore line is best left to the foolhardy.Text © www.rawbirds.com

Tuesday, 3 February 2015

TRUMPETER FINCH (Male) Bucanetes githagineus Las Parcelas, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

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The Trumpeter Finch (Bucanetes githagineus) occurs mainly in North West Africa and the Middle East. There is a small breeding population in South East Spain and it has recently expanded its breeding range into Turkey. This stocky, heavy billed finch is normally found in arid, stony, semi desert type habitat. Bucanetes githagineus subspecies B. g. amantum is endemic to the Canary Islands and is one of four subspecies recognised. On Fuerteventura, the track which runs alongside the goat farm at Las Parcelas and the surrounding plain are well-known area for them. Trumpeter Finches normally occur in small flocks but become dispersive during the breeding season (April) and they then can be difficult to locate.

LAS PARCELAS (GOAT FARM) Las Parcelas, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain.

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The goat farm at Las Parcelas and the surrounding plain holds some of the most sought after bird species on Fuerteventura. These include, Trumpeter Finch, Berthelot’s Pipit, Lesser Short-toed Lark, Black-bellied Sandgrouse, Stone Curlew, Cream Coloured Courser and Houbara Bustard.  Located west of the nearby village of Las Pacelas and at the start of a driveable track which leads to the Los Molinos dam and reservoir.