Bird, bug, butterfly and a wild variety of photos from Belarus, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Scotland and Spain by Irish wildlife photographer Patrick J. O'Keeffe and invited guests

Showing posts with label male. Show all posts
Showing posts with label male. Show all posts

Monday, 23 May 2016

BLUE ROCK THRUSH [Male] (Monticola solitarius) Kokino Chorio, Crete, Greece


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The Blue Rock Thrush (Monticola solitarius) is in the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae which is in the genus Monticola. Although superficially thrush-like in appearance, it is a species of chat that was formerly placed in the thrush family Turdidae. It breeds in  northwest Africa, southern Europe and across central Asia in a narrow band to Japan. There are five races or sub species recognised. The western population is sedentary but the eastern population is mainly migratory, wintering in sub Saharan Africa and southern Asia.
 Text © www.rawbirds.com

Monday, 2 May 2016

CRETAN FESTOON BUTTERFLY [Male] (Zerynthia cretica) Cape Kutri, Phalasarna, Crete, Greece

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The Cretan Festoon Butterfly (Zerynthia cretica) is an Old World swallowtail butterfly in the family Papilionidae which is in the genus Allancastria. This endemic species is found only on the Greek island of Crete but some authorities consider it to be a subspecies of the Eastern Festoon (Zerynthia cerisyi) and give it the scientific name (Zerynthia cerisyi cretica). The flight period is from mid-March to June. After the egg laying stage, the caterpillars hatch out to feed on the endemic Cretan Dutchman’s Pipe (Aristolochia cretensis). They then overwinter as a pupae and in mid to late spring emerge as butterflies.
Text © www.rawbirds.com

Thursday, 28 April 2016

COMMON CHAFFINCH (Fringilla coelebs subspecies F. c. schiebeli) male, Agia Marina, Crete, Greece


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The Common Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs) is a small tree nesting finch in the family Fringillidae which is in the genus Fringilla. It is commonly found throughout Europe (but is absent from Iceland), Western Asia and parts of North Africa. The northern populations are migratory and winters in the southern part of the range. There are many subspecies recognised including Fringilla coelebs schiebeli which occurs on Crete as well as in Southern Greece and Turkey. 
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Tuesday, 26 April 2016

WESTERN (ROMANIAN) YELLOW WAGTAIL (Male) (Motacilla flava subspecies M. f. dombrowskii) Palaiochora Harbour, Palaiochora, Crete, Greece


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The Western Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla flava) is of the family Motacillidae, which includes longclaws, pipits and wagtails. It is a summer resident in the temperate regions of Western Asia and Europe which migrates south in early autumn to winter in southern Asia and Africa. Up to 20 subspecies are recognised including the Romanian Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla flava dombrowskii).

Wednesday, 2 March 2016

EUROPEAN STONECHAT (Saxicola rubicola subspecies S. r. rubicola) male at Techniti Limni Agia, Agia Lake, Agia, Crete, Greece


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The European Stonechat (Saxicola rubicola) is of the chat family Muscicapidae which is in the genus Saxicola. Preferred habitats include rough grassland, sand dunes and heathland where it is typically seen perched on brambles, gorse or shrubs within the breeding area. 
In the temperate part of its range, nesting commences in late March and up to three broods are raised. It is a partial migrant. Populations from the colder regions move to spend the winter in southern Europe and northern Africa. Successive hard winters, as was the case in 2009/10 and 2010/11 caused severe losses in the mainly sedentary northwestern populations
There are two subspecies generally recognised, Saxicola rubicola rubicola occurs in central, eastern and southern Europe as well as northern Morocco and southeastern Turkey. Saxicola rubicola hibernans occurs in northwestern Europe including Britain, Ireland, France and Norway.
   
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Wednesday, 3 February 2016

BARN SWALLOW (Hirundo rustica) Techniti Limni Agia, Agia Lake, Agia, Crete, Greece

 
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  The Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) is of the family Hirundinae which is in the genus Hirundo . It is a summer resident which breeds in the Northern Hemisphere. There are small sedentary populations in some of the tropical parts of this range but during the summer it is mainly absent from the Indian sub-continent and South East Asia. This common and widespread insectivorous species feeds exclusively on small flies and midges. 
In late autumn with the onset of colder weather, when its prey items begin to diminish, it migrates south to its wintering areas. The North American population winters in Central and South America. The Eurasian population winters in sub-Saharan Africa, the Indian sub-continent, South East Asia and parts of Northern Australia. In early spring the return migration north begins. At least races are recognised.  
There are 74 species of hirundines which includes Swallows and Martins. In additional, the only known record of the Red Sea Cliff Swallow (Hirundo perdita) was of one found dead at Sanganeb Lighthouse, Sudan in May 1984.

  Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Thursday, 28 January 2016

SARDINIAN WARBLER (Male) (Sylvia melanocephala) Agia Marina, Crete, Greece


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The Sardinian Warbler (Sylvia melanocephala) is a small mainly insectivorous warbler of the family Sylviidae which is in the genus Sylvia. It is commonly encountered in southern and eastern Europe as well as in countries bordering the Mediterranean Basin. It is also resident on the Canary Islands. Some authorities recognise up to five subspecies. The female, typical of most sylvia warblers, has drabber plumage, it is grey headed with brownish upper parts and the under parts are washed buff. This species normally occurs in shrubby type habitat as well as in parks and gardens.
    Text © Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds.com 
 
Up to five subspecies are generally recognised:
  • Sylvia melanocephala melanocephala - Iberia across the northern Mediterranean to western Turkey. Extends into the Maghreb from Iberia, and into Libya from Italy via Sicily. Migrates to the Sahel and oases in the Sahara in winter.
  • Sylvia melanocephala leucogastra  - Canary Islands, resident, probably some vagrancy between eastern islands and Maghreb.
  • Sylvia melanocephala momus - Near East. Resident, some local movements. 
  • Sylvia melanocephala norissae - Fayyum Warbler - probably only a local morph of momus  - Nile Delta region. Extinct since around 1940.
  • Sylvia melanocephala valverdei - Morocco south to the Tropic of Cancer, inland to the edge of the Sahara. Resident, but some seasonal movements.
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinian_warbler

Sunday, 24 January 2016

WESTERN (BLACK HEADED) YELLOW WAGTAIL (Motacilla flava subspecies M.f. feldegg) male, Palaiochora Harbour, Palaiochora, Crete, Greece

 
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The Western Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla flava) is of the family Motacillidae which includes longclaws, pipits and wagtails. It is a summer resident in the temperate regions of Western Asia and Europe which migrates south in early autumn to winter in southern Asia and Africa. Up to 20 subspecies are recognised including the Black Headed Yellow Wagtail (Motacilla flava feldegg)
who’s breeding range extends east wards from the Balkans to the Caspian Sea and as far south as Iran.  
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Monday, 2 November 2015

LARGE COPPER BUTTERFLY (Lycaena dispar) male, Bihar Plain, Furta, Hajdú-Bihar megye, Hungary

 
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The Large Copper Butterfly (Lycaena dispar) is of the family Lycaenidae which is in the genus Lycaena. Its main strong hold is south western Asia and south eastern Europe. In addition there are isolated populations in France, Holland, Germany, Italy, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Kaliningrad and Poland. 
It is found in damp areas near lakes, canals, rivers and in fens where its larval food plants Docks (Rumex) occurs, this includes Water Dock (Rumex hydrolapathum), Curled Dock (Rumex crispus) and Broad Leaved Dock (Rumex obtusifolius)
Formally bred Britain (in East Anglia, England but became extinct by 1851), subsequent reintroductions failed to permanently re-establish it. There were also a number of attempts to establish a population in Ireland but to no avail and the last report was in 1953.  
 
Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Thursday, 29 October 2015

PALLID HARRIER (Circus macrourus) male Bihar Plain, Furta, Hajdú-Bihar megye, Hungary



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The Pallid Harrier (Circus macrourus) is of the family Accipitridae which is in the genus Circus.This is a scarce summer breeding resident in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. In recent times, it has expanded its range to the west and north in Europe. Its preferred habitats are open steppes, agricultural areas and grassland plains. Prey items include insects, rodents and small birds. The European population winters in sub Saharan Africa and the Asian population winters in the Indian sub-continent and South East Asia. 
  
  Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Sunday, 25 October 2015

EURASIAN PENDULINE TIT (Male) (Remiz pendulinus) Hortobágy National Park - The Puszta, Hortobágy, Debrecen, Hajdú-Bihar megye, Hungary

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The Eurasian Penduline Tit (Remiz pendulinus) is found in southern and central Europe as well as central and south western Asia. The northern population is migratory and in late autumn, retreats south to spend the winter in the warmer part of its range. It is generally found near fresh water with marginal trees and shrubs. It weaves an elaborate enclosed suspended nest with an angled downward facing tunnel entrance. Food items include a wide variety of small invertebrates and seeds. Text © www.rawbirds.com 

Monday, 28 September 2015

BARN SWALLOW (Hirundo rustica) Hortobágy National Park - The Puszta, Hortobágy, Debrecen, Hajdú-Bihar megye, Hungary

 
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  The Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) is of the family Hirundinae which is in the genus Hirundo . It is a summer resident which breeds in the Northern Hemisphere. There are small sedentary populations in some of the tropical parts of this range but during the summer it is mainly absent from the Indian sub-continent and South East Asia. This common and widespread insectivorous species feeds exclusively on small flies and midges. 
In late autumn with the onset of colder weather, when its prey items begin to diminish, it migrates south to its wintering areas. The North American population winters in Central and South America. The Eurasian population winters in sub-Saharan Africa, the Indian sub-continent, South East Asia and parts of Northern Australia. In early spring the return migration north begins. At least races are recognised.  
There are 74 species of hirundines which includes Swallows and Martins. In additional, the only known record of the Red Sea Cliff Swallow (Hirundo perdita) was of one found dead at Sanganeb Lighthouse, Sudan in May 1984.

  Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Tuesday, 22 September 2015

RED FOOTED FALCON (Male) (Falco vespertinus) Hortobágy National Park - The Puszta, Hortobágy, Debrecen, Hajdú-Bihar megye, Hungary

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The Red-footed Falcon (Falco vespertinus) breeds in eastern Europe and west, central and north-central Asia, with its main range from Belarus south to Hungary, northern Serbia and Montenegro, Romania, Moldova and east Bulgaria, eastward through Ukraine and north-west and south Russia and north Kazakhstan to extreme north-west China and the upper Lena river (Russia). It winters in southern Africa, from South Africa northwards to southern Kenya (Ferguson-Lees et al. 2001).  Text © iucnredlist.org (see full species status at  http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/22696432/00)

Tuesday, 15 September 2015

RED FOOTED FALCON (Male) (Falco vespertinus) Hortobágy National Park - The Puszta, Hortobágy, Debrecen, Hajdú-Bihar megye, Hungary

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The Red-footed Falcon (Falco vespertinus) breeds in eastern Europe and west, central and north-central Asia, with its main range from Belarus south to Hungary, northern Serbia and Montenegro, Romania, Moldova and east Bulgaria, eastward through Ukraine and north-west and south Russia and north Kazakhstan to extreme north-west China and the upper Lena river (Russia). It winters in southern Africa, from South Africa northwards to southern Kenya (Ferguson-Lees et al. 2001).  Text © iucnredlist.org (see full species status at  http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/22696432/00)

Thursday, 4 June 2015

SARDINIAN WARBLER [Male] (Sylvia melanocephala subspecies S. m. leucogastra) Barranco de Betancuria, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain


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The Sardinian Warbler (Sylvia melanocephala) is a small mainly insectivorous warbler of the family Sylviidae which is in the genus Sylvia. It is commonly encountered in southern and eastern Europe as well as in countries bordering the Mediterranean Basin. It is also resident on the Canary Islands. Some authorities recognise up to five subspecies. The female, typical of most sylvia warblers, has drabber plumage, it is grey headed with brownish upper parts and the under parts are washed buff. This species normally occurs in shrubby type habitat as well as in parks and gardens.
    Text © Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds.com

Up to five subspecies are generally recognised:
  • Sylvia melanocephala melanocephala - Iberia across the northern Mediterranean to western Turkey. Extends into the Maghreb from Iberia, and into Libya from Italy via Sicily. Migrates to the Sahel and oases in the Sahara in winter.
  • Sylvia melanocephala leucogastra  - Canary Islands, resident, probably some vagrancy between eastern islands and Maghreb.
  • Sylvia melanocephala momus - Near East. Resident, some local movements. 
  • Sylvia melanocephala norissae - Fayyum Warbler - probably only a local morph of momus  - Nile Delta region. Extinct since around 1940.
  • Sylvia melanocephala valverdei - Morocco south to the Tropic of Cancer, inland to the edge of the Sahara. Resident, but some seasonal movements.
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinian_warbler

Tuesday, 28 April 2015

TRUMPETER FINCH (Male) (Bucanetes githagineus subspecies B. g. amantum) Las Parcelas, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

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The Trumpeter Finch (Bucanetes githagineus) occurs mainly in North West Africa and the Middle East. There is a small breeding population in South East Spain and it has recently expanded its breeding range into Turkey. This stocky, heavy billed finch is normally found in arid, stony, semi desert type habitat. Bucanetes githagineus subspecies B. g. amantum is endemic to the Canary Islands and is one of four subspecies recognised. On Fuerteventura, the track which runs alongside the goat farm at Las Parcelas and the surrounding plain are well-known area for them. Trumpeter Finches normally occur in small flocks but become dispersive during the breeding season (April) and they then can be difficult to locate. This striking male is in full breeding plumage.  Text © www.rawbirds.com

Friday, 13 March 2015

EURASIAN KESTREL (Falco tinnunculus subspecies F. t. dacotiae) male with freshly killed ATLANTIC LIZARD (Gallotia atlantica), Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

 
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The Eurasian Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) is a small bird of prey of the family Falconidae which is in the genus Falco. Alternative names include European Kestrel, Common Kestrel or simply referred to as a Kestrel.

Tuesday, 3 February 2015

TRUMPETER FINCH (Male) Bucanetes githagineus Las Parcelas, Betancuria, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

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The Trumpeter Finch (Bucanetes githagineus) occurs mainly in North West Africa and the Middle East. There is a small breeding population in South East Spain and it has recently expanded its breeding range into Turkey. This stocky, heavy billed finch is normally found in arid, stony, semi desert type habitat. Bucanetes githagineus subspecies B. g. amantum is endemic to the Canary Islands and is one of four subspecies recognised. On Fuerteventura, the track which runs alongside the goat farm at Las Parcelas and the surrounding plain are well-known area for them. Trumpeter Finches normally occur in small flocks but become dispersive during the breeding season (April) and they then can be difficult to locate.

Sunday, 4 January 2015

SARDINIAN WARBLER (Male) Sylvia melanocephala ssp. S. m. leucogastra Las Penitas, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

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The Sardinian Warbler found on the Canary Islands is classified as a separate subspecies (Sylvia melanocephala leucogastra). It is shorter winged and has a thicker bill when compared to its mainland European counterpart. At times, it can be quite skulking as was the case here. As it hid in a Shrubby Launaea bush, it tried its best not to be photographed.