Bird, bug, butterfly and a wild variety of photos from Belarus, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Scotland and Spain by Irish wildlife photographer Patrick J. O'Keeffe and invited guests

Showing posts with label shorebird. Show all posts
Showing posts with label shorebird. Show all posts

Friday, 13 March 2020

RED KNOT [winter plumage] (Calidris canutus) Broadmeadow Estuary, Swords, Fingal, Co. Dublin, Ireland


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A small flock of Red Knot (Calidris canutus) in flight over the Big Marsh at the western end of the Broadmeadow Estuary, Fingal, Dublin, Ireland

Tuesday, 26 July 2016

WOOD SANDPIPER (Tringa glareola) Palaiochora Harbour, Palaiochora, Crete, Greece


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The Wood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola) is a medium sized shorebird or wader of the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Tringa. It is a summer resident which breeds across a wide band that stretches from the uplands of Scotland, where 10 to 25 pairs breed annually, to Scandinavia eastward to the Pacific coast of Asia. This long distant migrant spends the winter in sub Saharan Africa, southern Asia and parts of Australia. During spring and autumn, it is irregularly encountered outside its normal range as a scarce or rare overshooting migrant. 

Text © Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds.com

Thursday, 7 April 2016

COMMON SANDPIPER (Actitis hypoleucos) Palaiochora Harbour, Palaiochora, Crete, Greece


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The Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) is a small shorebird or wader in the family Scolopacidae which is in the genus Actitis. This Eurasian species is a summer resident that returns from its wintering areas in April. It breeds around fresh water lakes and has a scattered  distribution that extends from the Atlantic coast of Europe to Eastern Asia. Unlike most other shorebirds or waders seen on passage, it does not occur in flocks, single individuals are normally encountered. It migrates south in late Summer to spend the Winter in Africa, southern Asia and Australia. Small numbers over winter in western and southern Europe. The Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) is an almost identical species that is a summer resident in North America which winters in South America and to a lesser extent in parts of southern USA. It is a rare but annual vagrant in Europe. Remarkably in 1975, a pair attempted to breed on the Isle of Sky in Scotland but alas the eggs failed to hatch.
 
Reference: Patrick J. O'Keeffe / Raw Birds

Sunday, 31 January 2016

LITTLE STINT (Calidris minuta) Techniti Limni Agia, Agia Lake, Agia, Crete, Greece


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The Little Stint (Calidris minuta) is a small Eurasian species of shorebird (or wader) in the family Scolopacidae which breeds in the tundra areas of the Arctic. It is a long distance passage migrant that spends the winter in sub Saharan Africa and southern Asia. In addition, there are scattered wintering populations around the Mediterranean Basin as well as on the Atlantic coasts of France, Portugal and Spain. It is generally encountered in north west Europe during autumn migration and to a lesser extent during the spring passage.  
Text © www.rawbirds.com

Thursday, 11 June 2015

EURASIAN STONE CURLEW (Burhinus oedicnemus Subspecies B. o. insularum) La Olvia, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

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World-wide, there are nine species of Stone Curlew (also known as Thick-knee or Dikkop). They are found in both tropical and temperate regions. On the Iberian Peninsula, the Eurasian Stone Curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus) is sedentary but in the rest of Europe it is mainly a summer resident which winters in North Africa. The endemic subspecies Burhinus oedicnemus insularum occurs on the Canary Islands and its cryptic coloration help it blend in very well with the semi desert type habitat on Fuerteventura. 


Thursday, 19 February 2015

BLACK WINGED STILT [Female] (Himantopus himantopus) Los Molinos Reservoir, Las Parcelas, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain


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The Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) is one of three species of stilt, the others two are Black Stilt (Himantopus novaezelandiae) and Banded Stilt (Cladorhynchus leucocephalus). It is resident in Africa and also breeds across the temperate parts of Europe and Central Asia where it is a summer resident that migrates south for the winter to sub Saharan Africa, the Indian sub-continent and South East Asia. Within the warmer parts of this range, there is a sedentary population.  
In addition, there are also four subspecies or races recognised, which some authorities consider to be full species, 
  • Hawaiian Stilt (Himantopus himantopus knudseni) is resident on the Hawaiian Islands. 
  •  Black-necked Stilt (H. h.  mexicanus) occurs in the southern part of North America, Central America, the Caribbean, and the northern part of South America, including the Galapagos Islands
  • White-backed Stilt (H. h.  melanurus) occurs in central and southern South America
  • White-headed Stilt (H. h.  leucocephalus) occurs in Australasia, the Java Peninsula and the Philippines.
Formally absent from the Canary Islands, except as a vagrant, it is now a very rare resident on Fuerteventura and Lanzarote which first bred in 1994.


Wednesday, 28 January 2015

EURASIAN STONE CURLEW Burhinus oedicnemus Ssp B. o. insularum Tindaya, Fuerteventura, The Canary Islands, Spain

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World-wide, there are nine species of Stone Curlew (also known as Thick-knee or Dikkop). They are found in both tropical and temperate regions. On the Iberian Peninsula, the Eurasian Stone Curlew (Burhinus oedicnemus) is sedentary but in the rest of Europe it is mainly a summer resident which winters in North Africa. The endemic subspecies Burhinus oedicnemus insularum occurs on the Canary Islands and its cryptic coloration help it blend in very well with the semi desert type habitat on Fuerteventura.